Issue 99,

Vintage Issues Special Offer Buy this issue now for £4.00 (incl p+p)

New Welsh Review 99, Spring 2013


Editorial:


Swinging Our Beads on Caroline Street (Gwen Davies)

Wales is a very violent place with a binge drinking culture.
I say choose your friends and choose your family very
carefully. In Wales you are more likely to be assaulted by
someone you know than anywhere else in the UK.


So says Barbara Wilding, ex-Chief Constable of Wales, quoted by Zoë Brigley in the epigraph of ‘Rugby Club Love’. This is the opening poem of her word-and-image essay with photographer Nathan Roach, ‘Beyond the Barren Lands, Bridgend’s “Suicide Spate”’. There were reportedly twenty-five, mostly teenage, suicides in the Bridgend area between January 2007 and February 2009, mostly by hanging. Claims were made for a copy-cat cult, fueled by social networks and mass media coverage. Brigley’s poem, ‘Ruby Club Love’, deliberately exaggerates this death cult theory in lines such as ‘We ride our despair / like a troublesome horse; Mari Llwyd, the star-horse, horse of frost, / white horse of the sea, its skull stripped to pearly bone.’ But Roach’s photos tell a different story where death-on-a-rope isn’t the only alternative to living in the pub. Some may be of drunken crowds, but these are dancing joyously to local young bands. These lads, whether the skater boy on our cover or the chirpy members of band Your Local Hero, look to have a happy future and plans for what to do there.

Another tale of binge drinking and media frenzy is to be found in our Reviews section. Kaite O’Reilly assesses the photos of St Mary Street and capital nightlife by Maciej Dakowicz which in September 2011 sparked the Daily Mail headline ‘Shaming Images that Turned Britain into a Laughing Stock’. The images had already become a viral rash of the type you get when… oh, never mind. O’Reilly’s review of Cardiff After Dark concludes, ‘It’s Gin Lane with fewer clothes, more jokes, and no proselytizing, for Dakowicz is no Hogarth…. But… there are those who resent Cardiff being reduced to two streets and the activities of a partying, predominantly Caucasian minority. Cardiff was Britain’s first truly multicultural society, yet the breadth and richness of the city is not here. This is a Cardiff after dark, not the real, full Cardiff. Now that would be a worthy canvas for Dakowicz’s talents.’

read more...

Regulars

Pulp Kitchen Michael Nobbs on making a living online as an artist read more...
What Rhymes with Yonkers? Lloyd Robson in NYC read more...
Rich Text Tyler Keevil on his story collection, Burrard Inlet read more...

Essays

Spitsgerbgen The third in John Harrison's series, Islands on the Edge read more...
Alright, Cocker? Rachel Trezise, considering titles by Nicky Wire and Jarvis Cocker, asks when lyrics make poetry read more...
The Other Wales Catherine Fisher on the warped and wonderful image of Fantasy Wales in popular culture read more...
The Nightingale Silenced Jim Pratt reveals Margiad Evans' manuscript on the 'self-disaster' of her epilepsy read more...


Creative

Beyond the Barren Lands Brigend's 'Suicide Spate': poetry and photography by Zoë Brigley and Nathan Roach read more...
Shapes and Pieces A story by Tristan Hughes in response to Richard Hughes' A High Wind in Jamaica read more...
Lake Story
A short story preview from Mary-Ann Constantine's forthcoming collection All the Souls read more...

Poems


Z: From The Everyday English Dictionary
Ivy Alvarez read more...
Twobeat Deathsong
Christopher Meredith read more...
Narwhal and Bombshell
Dai George read more...
Tame
Terry Jones read more...

Reviews


Cardiff After Dark by Maciej Dakowicz
Kaite O’Reilly read more...

Ice by Gillian Clarke
Jasmine Donahaye read more...

After Brock by Paul Binding
Jeremy Hughes read more...

P L A C E by Jorie Graham
Jem Poster read more...

Poet to Poet: Edward Thomas’ Letters to Walter de la Mare ed. Judy Kendall
Jem Poster read more...

A Hunger Artist and Other Stories by Franz Kafka, trans. Joyce Crick
Amanda Hopkins read more...

The Ninjas by Jane Yeh
Sarah Coles read more...

A Radiance by Bethany W Pope
Sarah Coles read more...

Black Skin, Blue Books: African Americans and Wales, 1845-1945 by Daniel G Williams
Carl Plasa read more...

Flirting at the Funeral by Chris Keil
Katherine Stansfield read more...

The Roaring Boys by John Barnie
Kym Martindale read more...

Murmur by Menna Elfyn (& trans. Elin ap Hywel, Paul Henry, Gillian Clarke)
Rhiannon Marks read more...





You can now get a taste of some of the excellent pieces in this issue online:

See the contents of Issue:




Website design: mach2media and mopublications      Website development: Technoleg Taliesin Cyf.

Administration