Browse past editorials


Life is Sweet, and Short (Issue: 105)

This issue, subtitled Ailing, Healing, looks at art, illness and healing. Travel writers Gwyneth Lewis and John Harrison talked to me at Hay this year on the subject, including the balming boundaries of seamanship; the Bosun’s chimp as the barometer of a marriage’s health; the soothing heartbeat of iambic pentameter; being put on a hospital’s E-bay, and colonizing cancer as Conquistadors.
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Editorial Highlights Podcast Autumn 2014 issue (Issue: 104)

Editor Gwen Davies presents highlights from the upcoming autumn edition of New Welsh Review, issue 105.
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Dai Greatcoat and The Scribes of War (Issue: 104)

The Commemoration of two World Wars continues, so that we don't forget. But, as veterans die and family memories fade, do the dates 1914-18, in particular, mean much anymore?
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Summer issue 2014 editorial highlights podcast (Issue: 103)

First ever NWR podcast editorial revealing highlights of the summer 2014 issue in her own voice by New Welsh Review editor Gwen Davies
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Snow Geese (Issue: 103)

The American writer, Rebecca Solnit, loves repeating titles in her essay collections, and her latest, The Faraway Nearby, is no exception...
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Testimony (Issue: 102)

This winter edition focuses on Africa, Denbighshire, politics and testimony.
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Aurora Irrealis (Issue: 101)

Although the poetry in this grammar definition struck me, 'an exploration of the subjunctive' is a phrase unlikely to make a novel's blurb...
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Boing The Gong, We're 100! (Issue: 100)

MTV's recent travesty of post-industrial life, reality bonanza The Valleys, shows the danger of following the money when it comes to feeling Welsh.
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Swinging Our Beads on Caroline Street (Issue: 99)

Wales is a very violent place with a binge drinking culture. I say choose your friends and choose your family very carefully. In Wales you are more likely to be assaulted by someone you know than anywhere else ­­­­in the UK.
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Baron Samedi and Other Vital Illusions (Issue: 98)

NWR’S Winter edition is led by surfer Tom Anderson's essay on Havana, ‘Castro’s Capitol’. Here he gets to grips with Cuba’s Byzantine currencies of peso and CUC.
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The Talk Slides North (Issue: 97)

The summer edition looked far south, to Argentina and Antarctica. Now we look Far North.
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Pippi Grows Up (Issue: 96)

Pippi grown up would have become Dragon Tattoo’s überfeisty Lisbeth Salander.
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Questions, Answers, Fools and Kings (Issue: 95)

In 1954, author Caradog Prichard's mother died in Denbigh ‘seilam’, having spent thirty years inside.
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'It's raining fish, Halleluja!' and other magic (Issue: 94)

This Malcom Pryce-alike mash-up of detective story with magic and mayhem is a winning combo.
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The Quick, the Dead and the Daschund (Issue: 93)

Biographers, dealing as they are with lives passing (or gone), wrestle more than other writers with those inevitables:...
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Paper Clues v McKindless (Issue: 92)

'McKindless, three stories plus attic, deceased, valuation and clearance
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Somebody, Someday (Issue: 91)

Sitting down to approach this, I realised that there is only one thing harder to write than your first editorial
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Our Life Stories (Issue: 90)

In a recent article for waleshome.org, Dylan Moore laments the difficulties and risks of those who would seek to establish and develop a small literary magazine
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Here and There (Issue: 89)

When I took the helm of New Welsh Review in 2008, many trusted sources of wisdom and hard-won experience told me I was...
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Redux (Issue: 88)

This year's Academi Conference was held in February
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What Kind of Day Has it Been? (Issue: 87)

What Kind of Day Has it Been?
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Apparitions (Issue: 86)

While the mayhem of a busy desk may indicate otherwise, something is starting to take shape
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The Common Reader (Issue: 85)

As I write, the winner of the Wales Book of the Year has just been announced: Deborah Kay Davies for her remarkable...
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Twenty-One (Issue: 84)

This issue, New Welsh Review celebrates its twenty-first birthday
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Serious Times (Issue: 83)

Readers of New Welsh Review will not need reminding that these are serious and exceptional times in which we live
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Life and Times (Issue: 82)

The most exciting first editorials shoot from the hip
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Digital Cultures (Issue: 81)

The power of the worldwide web for a minority culture like Wales is clear, starved as it is of a serious broadsheet...
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Back to the Present (Issue: 80)

The photographs by Tina Carr and Annemarie Schöne that feature in this issue of New Welsh Review serve as a stark...
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Soundtracks and Scores (Issue: 79)

Welsh writing has been marching to a different beat since devolution: the last ten years have seen confident...
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Free For All (Issue: 78)

The e-book reader has arrived.
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Compass Points (Issue: 77)

Among the celebrations marking the centenary of the National Museum of Wales this year is a major exhibition of work...
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Dead Poets' Society (Issue: 76)

When I took over the editorship of this magazine in 2002, I decided that, apart from the first few editorials, I would...
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Wales and Film (Issue: 75)

A low-lying camera pans over a former airfield, recently colonised by folding chairs and unruly tents
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Writing on the Land (Issue: 74)

'What do bird-watchers, rock-climbers, walkers, shooters, botanists, offroad 4WD enthusiasts, farmers, parapentists,...
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Wales Through The Looking Glass (Issue: 73)

Early on in Mihangel Morgan's Melog, Dr Jones, its protagonist, makes a very significant literary discovery:
Strange...
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The Problem with Poetry (Issue: 72)

For an art form that - so we are told - has been in a terminal condition for almost two decades, poetry can, at the...
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Words and Pictures (Issue: 71)

Just over ten years ago, Planet Books published an intriguing and lavishly illustrated book, Words with Pictures: Welsh...
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Land of the Free? (Issue: 70)

Land of the Free?
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New Pastoral (Issue: 69)

Wales has been enjoying the success of its urban noir writers - Niall Griffiths, John Williams, Malcolm Pryce et al -...
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'Tell me all the other versions' (Issue: 68)

The shortlist selection made by judges Tony Brown, Patrick Hannan and Charlotte Williams this year has brought a...
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Out of the Flux (Issue: 67)

Dai Smith's review of Stephen Knight's A Hundred Years of Fiction (published in New Welsh Review 66) has provoked an...
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Devolution or Dissolution? (Issue: 66)

Devolution or Dissolution?
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'Alf and 'Alf - The poetics of diversity (Issue: 65)

Welsh-American academic and writer David Lloyd spoke at the Association for Welsh Writing in English conference several...
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'Hiraeth' and a new cultural ecology (Issue: 64)

On May 1st, the day on which ten 'new' countries gained accession to the European Union, I was amazed to read reports...
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Another Country (Issue: 63)

In New Welsh Review 61, I responded enthusiastically to Tony Bianchi's recent article on the Welsh noir novel, which...
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Dylan Adieu (Issue: 62)

It takes about half an hour to drive from Aberystwyth to New Quay, on a road that runs like a lip along the coastline
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How Black is Noir? (Issue: 61)


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War Archives (Issue: 60)


the madman and the statue stare
at the blackened flags,
the scattered bits, the empty space

and nothing has ever...
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Imaginative Landscapes (Issue: 59)

My sentimental attachment to the books of my childhood has, I admit it, as much to do with the memories of my young,...
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Everyone's a winner... (Issue: 58)

Even as the BBC's tired trot through the one hundred greatest Great Britons sent me to sleep in recent weeks, I...
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Shapes of Wales (Issue: 57)

As New Welsh Review was about to go to press, the National Eisteddfod was still in full swing
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First a gripe...And then the good news (Issue: 56)

What's the difference between Socialist Worker and New Welsh Review? Bizarrely, the revolutionary tabloid is the one...
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A prospect of the sea (Issue: 55)

I'm standing on the promenade, near the Mumbles, in Swansea, a few hundred yards from my home
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Prologue to an adventure (Issue: 54)

These are grave times, and naturally the contents of this issue of New Welsh Review are marked by terrible events and...
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A Difficult Time (Issue: 53)

Regular readers of New Welsh Review will be surprised to see an editorial that does not appear over the initials "R
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A defining moment (Issue: 52)

Spring 2001 has the hallmarks of a defining moment in modern Welsh history
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There is no editorial in this issue. (Issue: 51)


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New Welsh Review No. 50 (Issue: 50)

Welcome to the 50th issue of New Welsh Review! First, a special thanks is owed the many writers who over the past...
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A new deal for arts and culture? (Issue: 49)

A new deal for arts and culture?
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Representing Wales (Issue: 48)

In many ways it is strange that the world of modern rugby should be thrown into turmoil by revelations that some of the...
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Surviving the millennium (Issue: 47)

Will Wales still be around in 1,000 years time? Asking such an apocalyptic question is for once excusable as we move...
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Celebrating the millennium (Issue: 46)

A casual visitor from Mars could be forgiven for thinking that Wales is celebrating the second millennium of rugby...
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New Wales (Issue: 45)

It is very early to be drawing conclusions about the significance of the political earthquake which shook Wales on May...
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Less a National Assembly, more a Glamorgan C.C. on stilts (Issue: 44)

In the eighteen months since the Welsh electorate delivered that wafer-thin majority of 6,721 in favour of establishing...
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A Welsh policy for arts and culture (Issue: 43)

Wales is raising its profile
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Welsh writing and writers (Issue: 42)

In an ideal world, Wales's long and distinctive literary tradition would ensure a large market for the work of Welsh...
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"Re-branding" Wales (Issue: 41)

Devolution and the creation of Wales's first National Assembly since Owain Glyndwr is giving rise to sudden concern...
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The market for Wales's literature (Issue: 40)

The unforgiving demands of the market are of concern to everyone involved in the business of literature, particularly...
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A home for the Welsh Assembly (Issue: 39)

Cardiff poet, the late John Tripp wrote the lines below a quarter of a century ago
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Multiculturalism and national loyalties (Issue: 38)

"Multiculturalism is a divisive force
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The referendum on a Welsh Assembly (Issue: 37)

The people of Wales will be invited in a referendum in September to decide whether or not they want a Welsh national...
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Welsh versus English (Issue: 36)

For anybody old enough to remember Wales in the 1950s or earlier, the transformation in the status of the Welsh...
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The Numbers Game (Issue: 35)

Reading over 5,000 poems for the City of Cardiff International Poetry Competition inevitably gives the judges an...
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Living with the English (Issue: 34)

"Does it matter that Fred Inglis's biography of Raymond Williams often seems to get things wrong when it talks about...
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"Book of the Year" debacle (Issue: 33)

The recent decision to award the Arts Council of Wales's 1996 'Book of the Year' prize to Nigel Jenkins's study of the...
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The house we live in (Issue: 32)


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Ken Saro-Wiwa (Issue: 31)

It is savage comment on today's world that the closing weeks of Swansea's U
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English in Wales (Issue: 30)

Towards the Millennium is the title of a collection of essays on the arts scene in Wales just published by the Gregynog...
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Writers and the Nobel Prize (Issue: 29)

Sections of the London media have reacted with characteristic shortsightedness to the suggestion put forward in the...
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A Nobel for Ronald Stuart (Issue: 28)

With this issue, The New Welsh Review begins a campaign to secure R
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History and myth in the making (Issue: 27)

In its previous issue, the New Welsh Review caused upset in some quarters by carrying an extended, highly critical...
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Publishing in Wales (Issue: 26)

The New Welsh Review will shortly be launching, with the support of the Arts Council for Wales, a new annual...
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Poetry as publicity (Issue: 25)

Why were there no poets from Wales in the Poetry Society's recent promotion of 'New Generation' poets? Seven Scots,...
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The year of literature 1995 - and beyond (Issue: 24)

Sean Doran, the new Director of Swansea's UK Year of Literature 1995, has made a good start on picking up the pieces...
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William Shakespeare's Welsh connection (Issue: 23)

For somebody who was not a member of the aristocracy, William Shakespeare's life is exceptionally well documented
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The National Centre for Literature (Issue: 22)

The National Centre for Literature was the imaginative centrepiece of Swansea's successful bid to host the Arts Council...
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Swansea's Year of Literature (Issue: 21)

Is there to be a Year of Literature and Writing in Swansea in 1995? A casual observer could be forgiven for wondering...
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A 'Dialect Not' (Issue: 20)

Years of inquiry, consultation and preparation preceded the introduction of the English Order into the National...
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Caradoc Evans's Wales (Issue: 19)

IT is nearly 80 years since Caradoc Evans's burst on to the literary scene with a volume of short stories My People,...
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Editorial (Issue: 18)

The Government has set up yet another review of the teaching of English - to the exasperation of the teaching profession
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Editorial (Issue: 17)

The Government's creation of a Department of National Heritage with responsibility for the arts, broadcasting and sport...
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Editorial (Issue: 16)

Dylan Thomas deserves celebrating
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Editorial (Issue: 15)

'PLEASE Miss Aldridge,' Claire said at once, '
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Micheal Parnell 1934-1991 (Issue: 14)

Following the sudden death of the editor Micheal Parnell in September 1991, there is no editorial in New Welsh Review 14
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Editorial (Issue: 13)

A new editor doesn't have to cast about very far for something to say; his first two duties are plainly to look briefly...
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Editor's endnote (Issue: 12)

With this number, I am bidding farewell to The New Welsh Review, as its editor
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There is no editorial in this issue (Issue: 11)


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There is no editorial in this issue (Issue: 10)


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There is no editorial in this issue (Issue: 9)


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There is no editorial in this issue (Issue: 8)


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There is no editorial in this issue (Issue: 7)


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There is no editorial in this issue (Issue: 6)


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There is no editorial in this issue (Issue: 5)


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There is no editorial in this issue (Issue: 4)


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There is no editorial in this issue (Issue: 3)


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There is no editorial in this issue (Issue: 2)


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Editorial (Issue: 1)

Here is the first number of The New Welsh Review
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